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In this online luncheon, ACIL visiting fellow Annick Pijnenburg (Tilburg University) discusses ongoing work in her research on ‘At the frontiers of shared responsibility: the socio-economic rights of people on the move affected by cooperative migration control.’

Event details of The socio-economic rights of people on the move affected by cooperative migration control
Date 20 April 2020
Time 12:00 -13:00

Summary

In this ACIL luncheon Annick Pijnenburg will present her PhD research, which examines cooperative migration control policies, i.e. policies involving more than one State with the aim to stop, or at least substantially reduce, migration flows from the Global South to the Global North. Her research focuses on policies that involve sponsoring or ‘destination’ States in the Global North and cooperating States of origin or transit in the Global South. It looks in particular at policies whereby people on the move (i.e. refugees and migrants) are prevented from reaching a sponsoring State and therefore remain on the territory of cooperating States. This includes: the EU-Turkey Statement; Italy’s cooperation with the Libyan Coast Guard; US cooperation with Mexico and ist safe third country agreement with Guatemala, and Australia’s cooperation with Indonesia and Nauru.

Annick's PhD thesis focuses on State responsibility for violations of socio-economic rights that people on the move may suffer as a result of being ‘contained’ in the Global South. It seeks to answer the following research question: how does international law allocate responsibility to multiple States involved in cooperative migration control policies for violations of the socio- economic rights of people on the move affected by these policies? It does so in three steps. First, she examines what happens ‘on the ground’. She identify four types of cooperation that are predominant today as well as the impact that such policies have on the socio-economic rights of people on the move in cooperating States. Second, she discusses to what extent both sponsoring and cooperating States have obligations under IHRL to (contribute to) realising the rights of people on the move affected by cooperative migration control policies. Finally, she explores to what extent and how States involved in such policies share responsibility for violations of the socio-economic rights of people on the move.

The Speaker

Annick Pijnenburg is a PhD researcher at Tilburg Law School. Her research focuses on State responsibility for human rights violations in the context of migration deals. She is in the last year of her PhD trajectory, which is supervised by Prof. Conny Rijken (Tilburg University) and Prof. Thomas Gammeltoft-Hansen (Copenhagen University).

Registration

Please register if you would like to participate in this luncheon as an external participant.